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What is the RPC tenor piece like?

Question:
What is the RPC tenor piece like?
I'm curious to know what do the RPC tenor pieces play like? Are they link like with more edge or what? I've played a Barone Hollywood and it's my favorite piece so far, but I want an alternative piece to play smooth jazz, contemporary, funk, etc. I know I will probably have a piece with more of a baffle and I wouldn't have a problem with an HR piece. I was interested because while having the ability to play loud and with edge, I'd also like to maintain a core sound and warmth. How would the RPC 115b or even the Rollover do for this type of sound? It's also be great to be able to lay off of it a little and be able to play straight. If one piece can absolutely do it all, then great.

Answer:
I personally found the RPC's difficult to maintain a solid core with. The one I had was probably too open for me. I've always been curious to try the rollover but the fact that Ron recommends softer reeds kept me from trying one. I'm finding it difficult to have a solid core with too soft a reed.
Good luck.

Answer:
I suggest giving a Phil Barone Jazz a try for this type of sound. I believe the Jazz is Phil's best piece. It really is like the "best link you've ever tried" with a better core to boot!
I have tried a .105 rollover RPC, and it is really a good piece. It can get extremely loud, but also play very mellow. It's a very adaptive piece. It will play whatever you need them to play. I disagree with the above comment on how the RPC core sound is hard to get out. It plays with a very warm core sound (at least this rollover model that I played).
I ended up selling the RPC though in favor of keeping my Barone. I sometimes wish I hadn't sold the RPC though. They are both great pieces!

Answer:
I've been playing a tenor RPC .115B for the past couple of years and liked it so much I ordered another one. This time I got a .120B. Very similar, but I like the .120 even better. I haven't played every mpc out there, but this is the best-playing mpc, with the best sound I've found yet. One of its virtues is flexibility. It will maintain its tone quality at all volume levels and is very responsive. So maybe it's what you are looking for. I think it combines a fairly large chamber and open tip with the baffle so it's not as shrill as some baffled mpcs, but I'm no expert on mpc design. If you want a really bright, edgy sound, you may want something else, but if you want plenty of volume, power, projection, and still have some body to the sound, then the RPC might do the job.
It's been so long since I tried a Link that I really can't compare it to a Link. Maybe I should try one just to see the difference. I suspect the Link would be darker-sounding, but don't know for sure.

Answer:
I have a 115B and I would characterize it as more of an R&B piece than a smooth jazz piece.
I agree it has nice depth and warmth to the tone in the middle and low registers, like a good HR Link. The baffle is high, but it is not too long, so it doesn't really kick in that much until you get above G2. From there on up the piece plays really bright and edgy with huge volume if you want it. I have to use slightly softer reeds on it than on my smaller-tipped DV, but I find the V16 #3 works nicely and retains a decent core. The low end is night quite as big and dark as on my DV, but it is still very good.
With the baffle and big tip opening, this is the loudest piece I own. I'm keeping it for those blues bar open mics or for playing outside when I really need to let 'er rip. The craftsmanship on the piece is beautiful, it responds well, and seems really well made. I would like to try the 105R, but I haven't had the chance.

Answer:
I've got both; a rollover for dixieland and soft combo jobs and a high baffle for everything else. I find the newer rollovers to be a tad brighter than the older ones (I've use an old one, but have a new one as well), so considering the older ones can be fairly dark, the new rollover is probably going to be the more versatile piece. The high baffle will probably be the loudest mouthpiece you'll ever play. It too can be quite versatile, and could be used for smooth jazz, but when you have it on... you'll want to really, really blow.

Answer:
Originally Posted by bfoster64 I have a 115B and I would characterize it as more of an R&B piece than a smooth jazz piece.
I agree it has nice depth and warmth to the tone in the middle and low registers, like a good HR Link. The baffle is high, but it is not too long, so it doesn't really kick in that much until you get above G2. From there on up the piece plays really bright and edgy with huge volume if you want it. I have to use slightly softer reeds on it than on my smaller-tipped DV, but I find the V16 #3 works nicely and retains a decent core. The low end is night quite as big and dark as on my DV, but it is still very good.
With the baffle and big tip opening, this is the loudest piece I own. I'm keeping it for those blues bar open mics or for playing outside when I really need to let 'er rip. The craftsmanship on the piece is beautiful, it responds well, and seems really well made. I would like to try the 105R, but I haven't had the chance.
I agree with everything above, but would like to add that it is VERY easy to play. I don't work half as hard as I did on the Dukoff D7 I used previously.
In addition to V16 3s, I've tried 2 1/2 vandoren blue box, Superial 3s, and currently trying Jazz Select 3s. They all work fine on the piece, just the usual differences in control, altissimo etc. that is usual with different reeds.

Answer:
Originally Posted by JL I've been playing a tenor RPC .115B for the past couple of years and liked it so much I ordered another one. This time I got a .120B. Very similar, but I like the .120 even better. I haven't played every mpc out there, but this is the best-playing mpc, with the best sound I've found yet. One of its virtues is flexibility. It will maintain its tone quality at all volume levels and is very responsive. So maybe it's what you are looking for. I think it combines a fairly large chamber and open tip with the baffle so it's not as shrill as some baffled mpcs, but I'm no expert on mpc design. If you want a really bright, edgy sound, you may want something else, but if you want plenty of volume, power, projection, and still have some body to the sound, then the RPC might do the job.
I have a 120 with the rollover and JL just about sums it up for me. I also echo Hakukani's comment that it is easy to play. I would suspect someone without some developed chops would have troubles controlling this piece, though. I use Java 2.5's. Pretty darned versatile piece.
Steve

Answer:
In general, the bigger tip/softer reed is a bit harder to control (on any mpc), but you get used to it. On the .115 or .120 RPC, I like V16 2.5 reeds. The V16s run a bit harder by number than many others. I think the V16 3 would be a bit too hard for me on this mpc, but ymmv.

Answer:
That 120 is a 120B though; not a rollover. Right? Though I like his more open tipped high baffle pieces, his rollovers seem to work much better for me around 110.

Answer:
Originally Posted by Grumps That 120 is a 120B though; not a rollover. Right?
Is that for me Grumps? Mine is the 120 rollover. I tried a 110 rollover for a while, and just like the flexibility of the 120 a bit more. That said I seem to like bigger tip openings on my jazz/show pieces. I have a 90R for alto, and I actually covet my friend's 95R. I've been tempted a few times by those monster tenor 150's show up here to buy just for laughs and giggles.
Steve

Answer:
RPC Tenor Mouthpiece
Hello All,
I haven't really posted here too much but thought I'd offer my 2 cents on the RPC mouthpieces. I am currently using a tenor .125 that doesn't have a baffle built up on it as well as a high baffle .115 and really like them both for various reasons. The .125 is a very even, pure, open piece and really could be used for a variety of styles but for me doesn't cut enough in the louder situations. It might be similar to a Link in some regards but easier to control in my opinion. The .115 is the same as everyone else described and pops altissimo without any trouble. This piece reminds me of my Guardala Studio model but with more flexibility in sound, esp. subtone. The biggest change when switching to the RPC's is using softer reeds. I hope you are able to get an RPC bcause all of his mouthpieces are great and his attention to detail is awesome. You'll just have to let him know what you're going for and he'll try to accomodate that. Good Luck in your mouthpiece pursuits.
BTW, I also play RPC's on soprano, alto and bari-I ought to be the RPC poster child :D

Answer:
Originally Posted by qwerty Is that for me Grumps? Mine is the 120 rollover. No, JL actually. I believe he's got the 120B and not the R.

Answer:
Originally Posted by Grumps No, JL actually. I believe he's got the 120B and not the R.
Yeah, right, both mine are the baffled mpcs. But one thing baffles me a bit (sorry, couldn't resist the pun). The 120 has a higher and more pronounced step baffle, while my 115 has a lower, rounded, and kind of scooped out baffle. This might make more difference than the tip opening. The 120 with bigger baffle is slightly louder and more raucous, to my ear (my wife hears no difference), while at the same time deeper on the low end.
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